COLLABORATIVE DIVORCE AND FAMILY LAW IN FLORIDA. No matter how you look at it, divorce and family law matters are difficult to go through. Expectations of stability are shattered,

mistrust grows, and bills pile up. And then the litigation begins. Attorneys file and serve petitions, counterpetitions, requests to produce, and motions to compel. Each party hires dueling mental health experts to convince a judge that he or she should have more time with the children. Privacy is eliminated as each party’s life is probed and publicly questioned so that one side may gain a tactical advantage.

But there is a different way. A more civilized way. And it is called Collaborative Family Law (also known as Collaborative Divorce or Collaborative Practice).

We are a Collaborative law firm dedicated to helping people resolve personal disputes without destroying their families. We encourage the use of the Collaborative Family Law model in divorce, child custody, child support, alimony, post-judgment, prenuptial, and most other family law cases.  Further, Adam B. Cordover is an internationally-recognized leader in Collaborative Practice, a trainer who teaches other professionals how to help families Collaboratively, and author of an upcoming American Bar Association book on Collaborative Law.

Does Your Divorce Lawyer Meet IACP Minimum Standards for Collaborative Practitioners?

The International Academy of Collaborative Professionals has established Minimum Standards for Collaborative Practitioners, most recently revised in October 2014.  When you consider hiring a divorce attorney, and you are exploring the option of Collaborative Divorce, ask your potential attorney whether he or she meets each of the following Minimum Standards:

1. General Requirements:

1.1 The Collaborative practitioner is a member in good standing of: IACP; and a local Collaborative Practice group.
1.2 The Collaborative practitioner accepts the IACP Mission Statement.
1.3 The Collaborative practitioner diligently strives to practice in a manner consistent with the IACP Ethical Standards for Collaborative practitioners.
1.4 The trainings referred to in 2.2, 3.3 and 4.3 must be trainings that meet the IACP Minimum Standards for trainings delivered by trainers who meet the IACP Minimum Standards for Collaborative Trainers.

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Cordover Presents at Israeli Collaborative Divorce Training

Last week, I had the opportunity to present at an Israeli Introductory Interdisciplinary Collaborative Divorce Training.  I was invited by Idith Schaham, a friend and trainer who taught at the first Hebrew-language Introductory Collaborative Divorce Training and a co-founder of many Collaborative Law Community Centers in Israel.

I presented alongside my Tampa Bay Collaborative Trainer colleague, Jeremy Gaies, Psy.D., with whom I traveled to Israel in December 2018 to discuss Collaborative Practice with fellow professionals.

My presentation focused on “Preparing the Client for Team Meetings.”  Below you will find slides from the presentation, along with some explanation.

Introduction

The presentation started with my introduction.

This slide translates as follows:

Attorney Adam Cordover

  • Board Member of the International Academy of Collaborative Professionals (IACP).
  • Co-author of an American Bar Association (ABA) book on “Building A Successful Collaborative Family Law Practice.”
  • Former President of Next Generation Divorce.
  • Florida Supreme Court Certified Family Law Mediator.

 

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Collaborative Divorce May Not Be Right For You

Collaborative Divorce is a form of private dispute resolution where you and your spouse agree to use your attorneys solely for the purpose of reaching an out-of-court agreement.  Collaborative Divorce is not for everyone.  Though Collaborative Divorce has worked for thousands of families around the world, it may not be the right process for you.

This article explores whether Collaborative Divorce may not be right for you.

You want your “Day in Court”

You may want your “Day in Court.”  You may feel that, if only you could get in front of a judge, he or she would, of course, see the heroism innate in your positions and the dastardly deeds committed by your spouse.

What most litigants do not realize is that it can take months, or even years, to get in front of a judge to make final decisions regarding your divorce.  And that time in front of a judge can be quite limited, meaning you will only be able to tell the judge a small part of your marital story.  And it is up to the judge to determine which parts are relevant.  Last year, I created the following video to demonstrate this dilemma:

In Collaborative Divorce, judges do not decide outcomes.  You and your spouse decide outcomes.  The only time you go in front of a judge is when you and your spouse have already reached an agreement.

So, if you want your “Day in Court,” Collaborative Divorce may not be right for you.

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Cordover Presents at Indiana University Collaborative Law Class

I recently had the pleasure to speak via zoom with a Collaborative Law class at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law.  I was invited by Joshua Jones, who is a Visiting Assistant Clinical Professor of Law.

During the class, I was asked to talk about a whole variety of issues related to Collaborative Divorce and Family Law, including the following:

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Video: Tampa Parents Discuss Their Collaborative Divorce

Most people think of divorce as a declaration of war.  That is not the way it has to be.  Even if there are feelings of anger during separation, parents can work together to determine how they will continue to work together towards the best interests of their children.

In the link to the video below, Anne Lucas, Board Member of the International Academy of Collaborative Professionals, interviews Nikki DeBartolo and Ben Heldfond of Tampa Bay.  They went through a Collaborative Divorce, and they outlined their experience in their book, Our Happy Divorce.

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Interview: Mosten on Peacemaker Practice Self Survey

I recently had the opportunity to interview ADR legend Forrest “Woody” Mosten.  Woody has been on the forefront of Mediation and Collaborative Practice and is the founder of Unbundled Legal Services.  Woody also happens to be a friend and mentor of mine and my co-author of “Building A Successful Collaborative Family Law Practice” published by the American Bar Association in 2018.  You can find the video below.

You can find the Peacemaker Practice Self Survey reproduced below.

PEACEMAKER PRACTICE SELF-SURVEY

Forrest S. Mosten and Kevin Scudder[1]

Peacemaker Professionals are lawyers, mental health professionals, and financial professionals who deliver services to clients in a number of roles: Advisor, Information Provider, Organizer, Legal Counselor, Mediator, Evaluator, and other forms as service-provider.

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Lawyer Review: Collaborative Divorce Success Story

We strive to meet our clients’ needs during difficult times, and we are especially appreciative when clients share how we were able to help them.  A client recently left a glowing review for Collaborative Divorce services that we provided.  The review was left on Avvo.com.

Please note that every family’s situation is different, and we cannot promise the same or similar results for your family.

Collaborative Divorce Success Story

I highly recommend Adam Cordover. I had not heard of a collaborative divorce before my therapist recommended I speak with Adam. When I first met with him, he was warm and shared excellent information. I never felt pressured to do anything. I was seeking a divorce after a LONG marriage. There were bumps in the road but with the assistance of Adam and the team he assisted us put together, my former spouse and I were able to conclude a collaborative divorce and remain friends. The team approach allowed my ex-husband and I to turn what could have been a disaster into a continued mutual friendship. From start to finish, approximately 6 months, Adam and Jennifer were there for me every step of the way.

(emphasis added)

-Anonymous

Five Stars

If you are looking for a more peaceful way to go through divorce, we are here to help.


Adam B. Cordover is a leading Collaborative Divorce Lawyer in Tampa Bay who helps clients throughout the State of Florida.  He is an American Bar Association published author and member of the Board of the International Academy of Collaborative Professionals.  Adam has taught lawyers, mental health professionals, financial professionals, and mediators throughout the United States, Canada, France, and Israel how to offer Collaborative services.

Tips for Divorcing During Coronavirus

These are not normal times, and coronavirus is changing every aspect of life from working, to shopping, to interacting with family.  Divorce is not immune to these changes, and the way you approach divorce must, by necessity, be different.

Here are tips on divorcing during coronavirus.

Take a Breath

Divorce is difficult enough in the best of times.  During coronavirus, you are likely facing two traumas at once:  the end of a relationship with someone you thought you would be with forever, and the upending of your life and inability to go out and be with friends who would otherwise console you.  You or your spouse may begin doing things or saying things that seem completely out of character.

Take a breath.  A deep breath.  Try to center yourself.  This is especially important if you have children who are looking to you to be their rock.  They, too, are probably frightened, and need you to be stable for them when there is much instability around them.

And even if you do not have children, it is important that you make wise decisions now.  After all, these decisions will likely affect the rest of your life.  And you may find that these decisions may be easier if you just stop and take a deep breath first.

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Online Collaborative Divorce

You may be stuck in your house, but, with Online Collaborative Divorce, that does not mean that you have to be stuck in your marriage.

Online Collaborative Divorce brings together the best parts of consensual dispute resolution with technology that makes the process more convenient than ever.  And we can help you if at least one spouse (whether you or your partner) has lived in any part of Florida for the last 6 months.

The Basics of Collaborative Divorce

In 2017, the Florida Legislature passed the Collaborative Law Process Act.  In the Collaborative Law Process Act, the Legislature declared that “It is the policy of this state to encourage the peaceful resolution of disputes and the early resolution of pending litigation through a voluntary settlement process. The collaborative law process is a unique nonadversarial process that preserves a working relationship between the parties and reduces the emotional and financial toll of litigation.”  Section 61.55, Florida Statutes.

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Avoiding a Nasty Divorce

Avoiding A Nasty Divorce in Tampa Bay

If things are not going well in your marriage, whatever the circumstances, you want to avoid a nasty divorce.  You have probably seen how recriminations, dirty court tactics, and endless fighting have ruined friends and family.  Heck, you may still be feeling the consequences of your parents’ nasty divorce.  And you are looking to spare yourself and your family the same trauma.

Fortunately, there are alternatives.  One growing alternative is Collaborative Divorce.

Working Together to Avoid a Nasty Divorce

In Collaborative Divorce, you and your spouse work together – outside of the court system – to find resolutions that work for your family.  You and your spouse have separate lawyers for independent support, but the lawyers have one mission: find solutions.  Collaborative Lawyers are unlike traditional lawyers in that the law prohibits them from fighting in court.  This means that no time, energy, or money will be spent on frivolous lawsuits, opposition research, or damaging depositions.

Instead, Collaborative Lawyers encourage cooperation so you and your spouse can move on with your lives without harming your kids.  Further, Collaborative Lawyers provide you with the independent legal advice you need to feel comfortable that you are making informed decisions.

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