Tag Archive for: parental responsibility

Who has the Right to File a Paternity Suit?

Paternity is essentially the legal recognition that a man is the father of a child.  Establishment of paternity brings with it various rights and responsibilities, including (i) the right to establish a time-sharing (visitation) schedule for the father, (ii) the responsibility of the father to provide the child with financial support, and (iii) the right of the child to inherit from the father.

As stated in section 742.011 of the Florida Statutes, the following people may bring a paternity suit in Florida:

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Audio: The Difference of Collaborative Law Part 2

Attorney Juliette Ford continues her discussion on the differences between collaborative family law and traditional family law in the following clip:

Attorney Adam B. Cordover has completed advanced training in interdisciplinary  collaborative family law and is a member of the International Academy of Collaborative Professionals and the Collaborative Divorce Institute of Tampa Bay.

If you would like to speak with a collaborative lawyer and learn how the collaborative process can help your family, call The Law Firm of Adam B. Cordover, P.A., at 813-443-0615 or fill out our contact form.

Audio: The Difference of Collaborative Law Part 1

In the clip below, Australian lawyer Juliette Ford discusses the differences between the traditional divorce model and the collaborative family law model:

Attorney Adam B. Cordover has completed advanced training in interdisciplinary  collaborative family law and is a member of the International Academy of Collaborative Professionals and the Collaborative Divorce Institute of Tampa Bay.

If you would like to speak with a collaborative lawyer and learn how the collaborative process can help your family, call The Law Firm of Adam B. Cordover, P.A., at 813-443-0615 or fill out our contact form.

Video: Ten Reasons to Choose Collaborative Divorce

Click the following link to view a video produced by the International Academy of Collaborative Professionals. The video follows Sally and Lionel, a couple that have agreed to let cameras into their interdisciplinary collaborative divorce process:

http://video.collaborativepractice.com/video/default.html

Additionally, the video expounds upon the following ten reasons to chose collaborative divorce over the traditional litigation model:

1) Lawyers are specially trained to reduce conflict and negotiate wise settlements

2) The opportunity to protect your children from the damage caused by a high conflict divorce Read more

Will Collaborative Divorce Work in Your Case?

The collaborative law process may not be for every case.  The Collaborative Divorce Institute of Tampa Bay has some suggestions to help you determine whether the collaborative approach is right for you:

Perhaps you are ready for a divorce but are unsure of whether to approach the matter using the traditional court-based solution or whether you should turn to the new growing phenomenon of Collaborative Divorce. How do you know if this alternative is right for you?

If you wish and are able to:

  • Maintain a tone of respect, even when facing a difficult decision or disagreement.
  • Prioritize the needs of your children.
  • Listen objectively and consider the needs of you and your spouse equally.
  • Work to devise creative and unique solutions to your issues.
  • Plan for the future by reaching beyond your current frustration.
  • Behave ethically when interacting with your spouse and other Collaborative professionals.
  • Maintain control of the divorce process and not relegate it to the courts if a difficult situation arises.

Then Collaborative Divorce is a workable option for you. If this sounds like a comfortable solution for you we suggest you talk to a Collaborative lawyer or other Collaborative professional about your situation so they may help you make your final decision.

Attorney Adam B. Cordover has completed advanced training in interdisciplinary  collaborative family law and is a member of the International Academy of Collaborative Professionals and the Collaborative Divorce Institute of Tampa Bay.

If you wish to schedule a consultation with a collaborative lawyer, call The Law Firm of Adam B. Cordover, P.A., at 813-443-0615 or fill out our contact form.

Video: Collaborative Divorce Discussed on the Today Show

In the video below, collaborative divorce is discussed on NBC’s Today Show.  A couple and their attorneys delve into the benefits and process of this innovative type of family law practice:

As alluded to above, collaborative divorce is a team-centric model.  It is ideal for cases in which children are involved, as the collaborative team focuses on finding ways to maintain civility and a modicum of normality in difficult times.   Clients are in control of the process, as it is outside of the court system and that institution’s often-times rigid schedules and procedures.  Further, privacy is maintained because discussions are confidential and held within private offices rather than in open court.

If you have questions regarding collaborative divorce and wish to speak with a Tampa Bay attorney, call The Law Firm of Adam B. Cordover, P.A., at (813) 443-0615 or visit fill out our contact form.

Is Florida the Correct State for My Child Custody Issue?

Under chapter 61, Florida Statutes, a Florida court generally has jurisdiction for a new custody case (such as (i) divorce involving children’s issues/parenting plan, (ii) paternity/ establishment of time-sharing schedule, or (iii) temporary or concurrent custody of a child by a relative) only if one of the following is true:

  • The child has lived in Florida for at least six months immediately prior to the case being filed (even if the child is or has been temporarily absent from Florida);
  • The child has moved from Florida within the past six months, but prior to that lived in Florida for at least six months; or
  • No other state or country has jurisdiction over the child (or the court of the child’s home state or country has declined jurisdiction) and the child has significant connections to Florida.

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How Do I Discuss My Divorce With My Child?

Once a couple makes the decision to separate or divorce, one of the most difficult steps will be to discuss this decision with a child.  Risa Garon, a licensed clinical social worker, certified mediator, and Executive Director of the National Family Resiliency Center, Inc., provides the following advice regarding how to discuss an impending separation or divorce with a child:

1. Before you tell the children, speak to your spouse and decide what you will tell the children. Both parents should have the opportunity to speak.

2. Say what you think will be most helpful to them. Many parents want to tell exactly what happened in their adult relationship to their children. Parents can explain to their children how what they want to tell them will help them in understanding the separation.

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Hillsborough County – New Child Custody Proceedings Administrative Order

Chief Judge Manuel Menendez, Jr., of the Thirteenth Judicial Circuit (Hillsborough County) recently entered a new administrative order that pertains to child custody proceedings.  Below is a summary of AO S-2011-014:

  1. For Chapter 751 Proceedings (Temporary Custody of Minor Children by Extended Family):
    1. Uncontested and Contested Proceedings:  Petitions for temporary custody of a minor child by an extended family member (i.e., grandparent, aunt, uncle, cousin, etc.) must be written and signed under oath, and filed with the clerk of the court.  The case will be assigned to the Family Law/Domestic Relations Division.  An executed Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement (“UCCJEA”) Affidavit must be included with the petition.  If the petition is being filed with the parents’ permission, written, signed, and notarized consents must be provided, unless the parents provide their consents in open court.  If a petitioner is alleging that a parent has abandoned a child, the petitioner must have evidence of abandonment.
    2. Pending Dependency Proceedings:  If a dependency case is pending when a petition for temporary custody has been filed, the Family Law judge may transfer the petition to the Juvenile Dependency Division. Read more

Word Cloud: Section 61.13, Florida Statutes

Sometimes I find it helpful to look at family law issues from a different angle, and hopefully gain a new perspective.  I will be experimenting with this concept by creating word clouds from different statutes, rules, or cases.

Word clouds take the most commonly used terms from a text and resize them according to their frequency of use.

The following word cloud, created using Wordle.net, breaks down section 61.13, Florida Statutes, the main law dealing with child custody orders:

Word Cloud - Section 61.13, Florida Statutes

Word Cloud - Section 61.13, Florida Statutes

If you have questions regarding child custody and wish to schedule a consultation with a family law attorney in Tampa Bay, call The Law Firm of Adam B. Cordover, P.A., at (813) 443-0615.