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Video: Divorce TV – Collaborative Divorce Part 3

Attorney Adam B. Cordover has completed advanced training in interdisciplinary  collaborative family law and is a member of the International Academy of Collaborative Professionals and the Collaborative Divorce Institute of Tampa Bay.

If you would like to speak with a collaborative lawyer and learn how the collaborative process can help your family, call The Law Firm of Adam B. Cordover, P.A., at 813-443-0615 or fill out our contact form.

Video: Divorce TV – Collaborative Divorce Part 2

Attorney Adam B. Cordover has completed advanced training in interdisciplinary  collaborative family law and is a member of the International Academy of Collaborative Professionals and the Collaborative Divorce Institute of Tampa Bay.

If you would like to speak with a collaborative lawyer and learn how the collaborative process can help your family, call The Law Firm of Adam B. Cordover, P.A., at 813-443-0615 or fill out our contact form.

Video: Divorce TV – Collaborative Divorce Part 1

Attorney Adam B. Cordover has completed advanced training in interdisciplinary  collaborative family law and is a member of the International Academy of Collaborative Professionals and the Collaborative Divorce Institute of Tampa Bay.

If you would like to speak with a collaborative lawyer and learn how the collaborative process can help your family, call The Law Firm of Adam B. Cordover, P.A., at 813-443-0615 or fill out our contact form.

Collaborative Divorce: Keeping the Process Out of the Courts

The following passage of an article from the Collaborative Divorce Institute of Tampa Bay discusses a collaborative law agreement, how parties are encouraged to settle rather than institute a court action, and the differences between collaborative divorce and mediation:

     Once you decide that Collaborative Divorce is right for you, the first step is for each party and their attorney to sign a Collaborative Law Agreement. This agreement serves as a contract which ensures that the lawyers will act solely as settlement counsel only. By serving as settlement counsel your lawyers are contractually barred from ever going to Court in your divorce case. However, if at some point either party decides it would be more beneficial for the Court to settle a particular matter, you can terminate the Agreement at any time. This helps give you ultimate control of how your case is handled and guarantees an outcome suitable for all parties. It is important to remember that if you or the other party chooses to take a contested matter to the Court both attorneys are fired instantly and can not represent you before the court. Because the purpose of Collaborative divorce is to settle matters amicably and civilly, choosing to take a matter to the court is highly discouraged and may be to the detriment of both parties. This feature of Collaborative Divorce also enhances the possibility of a mutually pleasing outcome and encourages attorneys and clients to work in everyone’s best interest.

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Procedures for Mediation in Pasco and Pinellas Counties

The Sixth Judicial Circuit (Pasco and Pinellas Counties) recently released Administrative Order 2011-006 PA/PI-CIR which sets out the following procedures for mediation in family law matters:

Family Mediation:

a. When ordered by the presiding judge, or when automatically referred to mediation in accordance with this Administrative Order, parties must participate in mediation of family cases. Read more

Video: Professor Atwood Discusses Changes in Family Law Part 3

Barbara Atwood of the University of Arizona discusses how family law has changed in this video from Divorce TV:

Mediation FAQs

The Twelfth Judicial Circuit of Florida (DeSoto, Manatee, and Sarasota Counties) provides the following FAQs for family mediation:

What is Family Mediation?

Family Mediation is an informal meeting where the parties work out mutually agreeable settlements in Family Court cases.  Parties have the opportunity to explore options and negotiate voluntary agreements that may be submitted to the Court for approval.

Who participates?

Family Mediation provides an opportunity for parties involved in family litigation to engage in a facilitated discussion about the specific issues in their case.  Counsel for each party may attend the conference.  Other third parties may only participate if both sides agree.

What issues can be discussed?

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Video: Reducing the Costs of Your Divorce

The following video from eHow describes how spouses may reduce the costs of their divorce:

Parties should utilize alternative dispute resolution techniques such as mediation to help them reach agreements and reduce time and expense.

General Rules Governing Mediation

The Fifth Judicial Circuit of Florida (which includes Citrus, Hernando, Lake, Marion, and Sumter Counties) offers the following general rules for mediation:*

  1. Mediation is a supervised settlement conference presided over by a neutral mediator who suggests alternatives, analyzes issues, questions perceptions, uses logic, conducts private meetings with attorneys and their clients, stimulates negotiations between opposing sides, and keeps order. The mediator does NOT hear any testimony, review any evidence or make a decision. The only result of the Mediation Conference is the agreement, or non-agreement, of the parties. This is not an arbitration procedure.
  2. The appearance of counsel who will try the case, and their clients (a management representative if a corporate party) with full authority to enter into a full and complete compromise and settlement is mandatory. An insured party must have a fully authorized representative (not the attorney) of the insurance company attend the mediation conference. Read more

Helping Children Cope With Divorce

The Virginia State Bar’s Family Law Section has produced a video which discusses the impact of divorce on children and how parents can go about easing the transition.  The video, entitled “Spare the Child,” utilizes personal stories and everyday language to promote the emotional well-being of children as they go through a family law proceeding.  You may access the video after the jump (click “continue reading”):

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