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Does Florida Have Alimony Guidelines?

When judges and child support hearing officers determine what amount of child support a parent should pay, they have a formula to help guide them to a proper child support amount. These guidelines take into account each party’s income, the amount of time a child spends with each party, and the amount of money each party spends on healthcare and daycare for the child.

So does Florida have any similar guidelines to help a judge determine a proper amount of alimony?

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Opposing Sides Brace for 2013 Florida Alimony Reform Legislative Battle

As I recently relayed, the end of the 2012 Florida Legislative Session marked the death of alimony reform for the year.  That is not to say that Florida alimony reform is dead forever.

The Florida Bar News is reporting that Alan Frischer, head of the the Florida Alimony Reform Group, is preparing once again to lobby for elimination of the concept of permanent alimony, among other things, in the 2013 legislative session.  Florida Alimony Reform says that it simply wants parties to be able to move on with their lives following a divorce without the cord of permanent alimony tieing them together.

But Frischer is facing stiff resistance from the Florida Bar’s Family Law Section (full disclosure:  I am a member of the Florida’ Bar’s Family Law Section).  From the Florida Bar News:

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No Changes to Florida Alimony Laws

In previous posts, I had written about proposed changes to the Florida Alimony Statute (section 61.08, Florida Statutes) that were under consideration in Florida Senate Bill 748 and Florida House Bill 549.

Well, as it turns out, neither of these bills passed in the Florida Legislature’s 2012 session. On March 9, the Senate Bill died in Rules, while the House Bill died in Judiciary.

If you have questions concerning your Florida alimony case and you are looking to retain a Tampa Bay alimony attorney, contact The Law Firm of Adam B. Cordover, P.A., at 813-443-0615 or by filling out our online form.

Text of Florida Senate Bill 748 – Proposed Changes to Alimony Laws in Florida

Yesterday I wrote an update on changes that the Florida Senate is proposing to make to current alimony laws.  Below is the text of the current version of Senate Bill 748 (added text is underlined, while deleted text is stricken):

An act relating to dissolution of marriage; amending s. 61.08, F.S.; revising the factors to be considered for alimony awards, including adultery; requiring a court to make certain written findings concerning alimony; providing that if the court orders a party to provide security to protect an award of alimony, the court may so order only upon a showing of special circumstances; requiring that the court make specific evidentiary findings regarding the availability, cost, and financial impact on the obligated party to support the award of security; revising provisions for an award of durational alimony; redesignating permanent alimony as long-term alimony and revising provisions relating to its award; amending s. 61.14, F.S.; prohibiting a court from reserving jurisdiction to reinstate an alimony award if a supportive relationship ends; providing that a modification or termination of an alimony award is retroactive to the date of filing; requiring the court to consider certain specified factors in determining if the obligor’s retirement is reasonable; amending s. 61.19, F.S.; prohibiting the court from granting a final dissolution of marriage with a reservation of jurisdiction during the first 180 days after the date of service of the original petition for dissolution of marriage to subsequently determine all other substantive issues except in exceptional circumstances; authorizing the court to grant a final dissolution of marriage with a reservation of jurisdiction to subsequently determine all other substantive issues only if the court enters such other temporary orders as are necessary to protect the interests of the parties and their children; providing circumstances in which the court is not required to enter a temporary order; providing an effective date.

Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:

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